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Gluten and a Child’s Risk of Schizophrenia

Eating gluten during pregnancy may raise your child’s risk of adult schizophrenia. Think whole wheat makes for a healthy pregnancy? If so, think again. A newer study shows that a gluten sensitivity may more than double your child’s risk of developing schizophrenia later in life.1 Gluten is the protein found in wheat, spelt, rye, barley, kamut, and triticale (unless designated gluten-free, oats are contaminated by wheat gluten). Read more…

 


US Perspective on Gluten-Related Diseases

Celiac disease (CD), non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), and wheat allergy (WA) represent a spectrum of immune-mediated reactions to wheat and in some cases specifically gluten, a protein composite of gliadin and gluten in. Once believed to be relatively rare, particularly in the US, it is now thought that gluten-related disorders affect nearly 10% of the population.2 Although the genetic association, environmental triggers, and autoantibodies produced in CD have been identified, the pathophysiology of NCGS is unclear. The extensive clinical variability appreciated in WA further adds to the intrigue of this major food staple.
Read more…

 

 

The Conundrum of Gluten Sensitivity, Why the Tests are Often Wrong. Purring vs Rumbling

Many of us believe that the toxic peptides of gluten found in wheat, rye and barley may detrimentally affect any tissue in the body and are not restricted to the intestines. As a matter-of-fact, one of the ‘mantras’ of the Gluten Sensitivity network comes from an 8-yr old article: “That gluten sensitivity is regarded as principally a disease of the small bowel is a historical misconception.1” There is a key word in this statement which I suspect was an emphasis of the Author’s message and sets the tone for this article (and this Network Movement). That key word is ‘principally’. Is Gluten Sensitivity ‘principally’ a disease of the small intestine? Point-blank answer – No it is not. For every Gluten Sensitive patient with the symptoms of an enteropathy (Classic Celiac Disease), there are 8 with no GI symptoms. Read full article here…

 


Differentiating Gluten Related Disorders

What a paradigm shifting moment in history when the world accepted that the earth was not flat! Opened up new lines of thought, new visions of what was possible and new adventures to dream. A similar paradigm shift has occurred within the health care field with the recognition that Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity is at least six-fold, and (so-far) as high as 20-fold more frequent than Celiac Disease. Read more…

 

 


Gluten Sensitivity without Celiac Disease: It is a Fad?

THE MYTH: Gluten Sensitivity without Celiac Disease is a Fad

 THE TRUTH: Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is not only real, but experts also tell us it is the most common (and non-recognized) condition in the family of gluten-related disorders. Read the full article here..

                                                                                 

 

 

 

Celiac Disease: One of the Most Common Lifelong Disorders in the US and Europe!

What is the Difference Between Celiac Disease and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity?

 
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