Detox and Sauna!

Before we get to the deep dive (below), which I know you will totally appreciate, let’s start with the BENEFITS of Sauna!

Personally, I adore sitting in a sauna and do it very often.  When you sit in your infrared sauna…you’ll love the relaxing warmth, the way it soothes your muscles and boosts your happiness…and the knowledge that you’re doing something EXCELLENT for your health. 

And a growing amount of evidence shows saunas to be a POWERFUL force for health—that can trigger your body’s natural HEALING and ANTI-AGING mechanisms. What benefits can you expect?

Let’s Start With Stress! Saunas have been traditionally used to ease stress and produce feelings of relaxation. Saunas feel good. Sitting in your sauna, in the comfort and privacy of your own home, will calm you like nothing else can. Stress is literally killing us. Sadly, a heart attack happens every 43 seconds in the U.S. Stress is also linked to the 6 most deadly diseases, including stroke and high blood pressure.

Cardiovascular Health: In 1981, the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reported that: “Regular use of a sauna may impart similar stress on the cardiovascular system, and its regular use may be as effective as a means of cardiovascular conditioning and burning calories as regular exercise.(1)

In addition, a large study conducted in Finland showed saunas to be beneficial for preventing cardiovascular deaths. In the study, compared to men who never use the sauna, frequent sauna users (4-7 times per week) were 50% less likely to die from cardiovascular-related causes.(2)

Weight Loss: Did you know the science says that you can burn up to 600 calories in one 30-minute sauna session? YES! According to research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.(3)

Saunas heat your core body temperature, increasing your blood flow and heart rate (much like exercise)—which has been shown to help you lose weight. Research conducted by Binghamton University found that, on average, participants who spent a 45-minute session in an infrared sauna 3 times a week lost 4% body fat in 16 weeks.(4)

Detoxification: Sweat is one of the major elimination channels for toxins. Heat above 160 degrees also causes the body to produce heat shock proteins, which help detoxify your body at the cellular level. Many doctors recommend saunas for supporting your body’s natural detoxification systems. 

  • In fact, toxicologists have shown that sweating is a major method of excreting pesticides(5) and toxic metals(6), including cadmium, lead, and aluminum.
  • By using the sauna repeatedly, high mercury levels can be reduced to normal.(7)
  • Studies have also shown that saunas can help rid the body of Bisphenol A (BPA).(8)
  • Additionally, sauna therapy has proven to be useful for people with mold exposure and mycotoxins.(9)

Immune System:  Infrared saunas raise your body temperature, inducing an artificial fever. This “fake fever” stimulates the immune system, resulting in an increased production of disease-fighting white blood cells and antibodies. A 1% increase in body temperature results in a 40% increase in immunity, according to Nobuhiro Yoshimizu, MD, PhD.(10)

In fact, research shows that regular sauna use can lead to significantly fewer incidences of the common cold!(11)

Beauty Benefits: A study published in The Journal of Cosmetic and Laser Therapy showed significant improvements in skin appearance after regular near-infrared use.(12) Participants in the study experienced a reduction in wrinkles and crow’s feet, as well as improved overall skin tone, including softness, smoothness, elasticity, clarity, and firmness.

And many people report healthier skin and fewer skin issues with regular sauna use, such as:

  • Improved tone and texture
  • Greater elasticity
  • Wrinkle reduction
  • Improved stretch marks and cellulite
  • Treating and preventing acne

When you get out of your sauna, expect your skin to be pink, and thousands of pores cleansed of impurities. But that’s not all…

That’s only some proven benefits research is finding for sauna use. Other papers and clinical trials report impressive improvements in:

  • Pain(13)
  • Inflammation(14)
  • Arthritis(15)
  • Improved Sleep(16)
  • Mood Disorders(17)
  • Improved quality of life for diabetes(18)
  • Reduced risk of stroke(19)

Yes, it’s quickly becoming more common – and largely accepted – that during your lifetime, you’ll experience declining health. Almost as if there was an expectation to suffer from one or more of these issues, among others:  joint or back pain and stiffness, brain fog or cognitive decline, thinning bones, or being diagnosed with various health challenges.

As you may know, exercise and eating a balanced diet are 2 essential pillars that can help you age gracefully – But did you know that another is…HEAT?

And – one powerful way you can experience the profound healing of heat is with an INFRARED SAUNA – a place where you can truly relax in your own home. A sauna engages your body’s NATURAL healing and health-supporting mechanisms using heat, and healing infrared rays. 

A sauna is beneficial in a variety of ways, including but not limited to: 

  • Enhanced weight loss
  • Pain relief
  • Detoxifying
  • Clearer and healthier skin
  • Heart health
  • Boosts immunity
  • Improved mental health
  • Reduced inflammation
    …and MORE
  • Enhanced weight loss
  • Pain relief
  • Detoxifying
  • Clearer and healthier skin 
  • Heart health
  • Boosts immunity
  • Improved mental health
  • Reduced inflammation
    …and MORE

In fact, there is a growing amount of evidence that shows saunas to be a POWERFUL health force that can trigger your body’s natural healing and anti-aging mechanisms. 

In summary, let’s be honest, we all could use a little more relaxation and detoxification – and sweat happens to be one of the major elimination channels for toxins. Actually, heat above 160 degrees also triggers the body to produce heat shock proteins, which helps to detoxify your body at the cellular level. 

That’s only some of the PROVEN benefits research is finding for regular sauna use. 

We promote a handful of sauna companies several times a year.  Be sure to watch your email – we’ll always say SAUNA in the subject line to let you know when we have a special VIP Q&A event on this powerful health restorative. 

Citations:

1. W. Dean. (1981). Effect of Sweating.  Journal of the American Medical Association. 246: 623. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/360118

2. Laukkanen, Tanjaniina, et al. (April 2015). Association Between Sauna Bathing and Fatal Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality Events. JAMA Internal Medicine. 175, no. 4: 542. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25705824

3. W. Dean. Effect of Sweating. (1981). Journal of the American Medical Association. 246: 623. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/360118

4. https://infraredsauna.com/weightlossstudy.pdf

5. Stephen J. Genuis, et al. (2016). Human Elimination of Organochlorine Pesticides: Blood, Urine, and Sweat Study. BioMed Research International. vol. 2016, Article ID 1624643, 10 pages. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2016/1624643

6. Genuis, S.J.,et al. (2011). Blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) study: monitoring and elimination of bioaccumulated toxic elements. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 61: 344–357. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21057782

7. Sears, M. et al. (2012). Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury in Sweat: A Systematic Review. Journal of Environmental and Public Health. 2012. 184745. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3312275/pdf/JEPH2012-184745.pdf

8. Genuis, Stephen J et al. (2012). Human excretion of bisphenol A: blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) study. Journal of environmental and public health. vol. 2012 (2012): 185731. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jeph/2012/185731

9. Rea, W.J. (2018). A large case-series of successful treatment of patients exposed to mold and mycotoxin. Clin Ther. 2018; 40: 889–893. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29861191

10. Yoshimizu, Nakamachi Nobuhiro, M.D., Ph.D. The Fourth Treatment for Medical Refugees. https://www.bio-mats.com/infrared/the-fourth-treatment-for-medical-refugees

11. E. Ernst, et al. (1990). Regular Sauna Bathing and the Incidence of Common Colds. Annals of Medicine. 22:4, 225-227. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2248758

12. B.A. Russell, et al. (2005). Study to Determine the Efficacy of Combination LED Light Therapy (633nm and 830 nm) in Facial Skin Rejuvenation. Journal of Cosmetic and Laser Therapy. 2005; 7: pp 196-200. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16414908

13. Matsushita, K. et al. (2008). Efficacy of Waon Therapy for Fibromyalgia. >Internal Medicine. (Tokyo, Japan). 47. 1473-6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18703857

14. Laukkanen, J. et al. (2017). Sauna bathing and systemic inflammation. European Journal of Epidemiology. 33. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29209938

15. Oosterveld, F. et al. (2008). Infrared sauna in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Clinical Rheumatology. 28. 29-34. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18685882

16. Hussain, J. (2019). A Hot Topic for Health: Results of the Global Sauna Survey. Complementary Therapies in Medicine. 44. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31126560

17. Janssen, C. et al. (2016). Whole-Body Hyperthermia for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 73. 789-795. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27172277

18. Beever, R. (2010). The Effects of Repeated Thermal Therapy on Quality of Life in Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. (New York, N.Y.). 16. 677-81. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20569036

19. Setor K. K., et al. (2018). Sauna bathing reduces the risk of stroke in Finnish men and women. Neurology. May 2018, 90 (22) e1937-e1944; https://n.neurology.org/content/90/22/e1937